Exposed. 2017

Exhibition dates: July 22 – October 21, 2017
Curator: Rachel Moore.

Assistant Curator Stephanie Walker

Image: Lionel Smit. "Morphous." Courtesy of CYNTHIA-REEVES.

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Participating artists

Theodore Ceraldi
Christopher Curtis
Mark diSuvero
Tom Douglas
Walter Horak
Colin Moore
Rodrigo Nava
Victoria Palermo
Karen Petersen
Lionel Smit
Judith Wrend


Theodore Ceraldi

Work Statement

Work Statement
Debate has been a human endeavor since Paradise Lost. It is the reason for language replacing a simple nod for yes or a side-to-side for no. If only we could pair it down to a yes or no, we would all become human beings once more.

Bio
Ted Ceraldi's sculpture and drawing has been exhibited worldwide, in venues as prestigious as the MoMA. He has also taught classes in architecture, design, and fine arts.

www.ceraldi.net


Christopher Curtis

Work Statement
Zipper is about mankind’s place in the natural world and how we fit into the continuum of geologic time. The granite boulder, originally formed as part of the pluton in Barre, Vermont some 380 million years ago, weathered out of the bedrock and endured repeated cycles of wearing by glaciers, until finally released from glacial ice about 11,000 years ago. Geometric cuts in the stone show anthropogenic intervention on the natural boulder, as the modern world meets the natural world. The title Zipper further underscores this contrast. Scientists have named the current geologic period, beginning in 1950, the Anthropocene—a time in which human activities have begun to affect the health of our planet. Zipper, made of Devonian granite, is likely to survive beyond the Anthropocene epoch.

Bio
Christopher Curtis was born in Stowe in 1951. At the University of Vermont, he cut his first stone under the instruction of Paul Aschenbach. Though Curtis’ work employs current technology, his abiding fascination is with raw stone. He sees in each stone both its ancient history and its unique shape. For Curtis, stones are objects, not just material. That makes the discovery, selection and recovery of the stone an important and enjoyable part of his work. He has studied the geologic history of his native Vermont, following the ancient lines of glaciers and inland seas to find stones whose stories resonate with the sculptures they become.

www.christophercurtis.com


Mark diSuvero

Work Statement
“I like the idea of inclusion of experience into sculpture. I think that the pieces ideally should be maternal, nurturing; they should be harmonious; they should have a capacity for a special kind of wildness, and yet at the same time, a kind of warmth. It’s very hard to put all that into steel.”

from a video: Dirk Van Dall, Storm King. Dreamtime Productions, Produced by Richard Bellamy (videotape, 22 min). Transcribed by Monroe Denton.

“We all react to certain forms. There’s no such thing as anti-form. However, there is symbolic logic at work in the world, such as in the stock market, and laws of media, technology, and other complex invisible forces, and they are inadvertently shifting people’s lives. What is very beautiful about sculpture is that the direct form is immediately made visible, and there is still this satisfaction of looking at it. It’s a weird embrace of paradox reconciling us to the world – maybe reconciling is too limiting; we should be charged with spirit seeing these things.”
Ann Wilson Lloyd, “Take Me to the River,” Contemporanea Vol. III no. 4 (April 1990), pp. 70-74.

Bio
Internationally renowned sculptor Mark di Suvero was born in Shanghai, China, in 1933. He immigrated to the United States in 1941. Di Suvero began showing his sculpture in the late 1950's and is one of the most important American artists to emerge from the Abstract Expressionist era. A pioneer in the use of steel, di Suvero is without peer in the exhibition of public sculpture worldwide. Mark di Suvero's architectural-scale sculptures - many with moving elements that invite viewer participation - have been exhibited around the world.

Mark di Suvero is a lifelong activist for peace and social justice, and has demonstrated a generous commitment to helping artists. In 1986, he established Socrates Sculpture Park on the East River in New York. To date, the park has exhibited the work of over 1100 artists.

In 2010, di Suvero was a recipient of the National Medal of Arts.


www.spacetimecc.com


Tom Douglas

Work Statement
Aloft is my vision of flight and migration intertwined with the simplicity and joy of an earlier time. My favorite pieces are those where I take the familiar, like a paper airplane, and modify it to the point where it contradicts its most basic characteristics. Removing the fragile nature of paper and adopting the strength of stainless steel in its stead appealed to me greatly. The material displays strength, yet maintains the natural lightness of paper in its final form. The viewer sees steel but envisions the crisp edges of paper, its flexibility and subtle curves. The pedestal on which the plane sits allows the viewer to feel its motion. The angle of it pushing the plane forward, canting its nose up and rolling it to the left, completes the illusion of movement, allowing the viewer to be drawn ahead in time and space.

Bio
Tom Douglas is a native of Vermont and lives in Jericho with his wife and three daughters. Since graduating from the University of Vermont with a BA in studio art in 2009, Douglas has worked as a gallery assistant at the West Branch Gallery in Stowe. Prior to that he worked for the scene shop in the theater department at the University of Vermont, assisting in set construction. It was there that Douglas became excited about the recreation of everyday objects into three-dimensional works of art.

 



Walter Horak

Work Statement
Fulcrum is one in a series of pieces that I might describe as sculptural choreography: Multiple figures posed together in a dynamic stasis. Since early in my career, I’ve been inspired by modern dance groups like Pilobolus, which explore themes of tension, balance, rhythm, and movement. The figure is a nearly ancillary element in the whole. Similarly, while I rely on a certain degree of anatomical realism in Fulcrum, my focus is the success of the overall composition.


Bio
Walter Horak studied fine arts at Harvard, drawing inspiration from ancient figurative traditions as well as modernist aesthetics. He then attended graduate school at the Rhode Island School of Design, which kindled his desire to make sculpture of his own. More than four decades later, he continues to create pieces that involve a signature gesture or lively choreography of multiple forms. During his career as a visual artist, Horak has held various teaching positions, ranging from primary school through the college level. He resides with his wife in a rural corner of coastal Rhode Island.

walterhorak.com


Colin Moore

Work Statement
As I start a new project I usually focus on a concept I wish to communicate, and then figure how to bring that expression into our physical world. When I created Emily I had several other projects that were my main focus at that time. Emily was more of a side project that would get attention on an intermittent basis when I had time. The sculpture continued to progress with stops and starts in an intuitive fashion. It wasn't till December, a few weeks before Christmas, as I started the casting process, that I came to realize why I had created this sculpture which was now hollow; my daughter had moved to California, and I felt a void in her absence.

Bio
Colin Moore grew up in the Boston area.  During a summer job working as an Ironworker he realized he loved building with his hands, staying with it for 30 years while working in many regions across the country. Colin’s commercial art career began in the 70’s, bending steel in playful forms to make studio furniture. His interest lies in representing the human condition and experimenting with materials in new ways to represent our humanity.  Colin received a BFA at the Massachusetts School or Art and Design in 2008 and an MFA at New York Academy in 2012.  He currently teaches as an adjunct professor at the Massachusetts School of Art and Design and resides in Boston with his wife and youngest daughter.

www.colinmooresculpture.com



Rodrigo Nava

Work Statement:
In an effort to continue the dialogue of contemporary sculpture, I have developed a unique and new process that allows me to create nonrepresentational sculptures that are the authentic result of the relationship between material, process, artist, and viewer. Marker Form consists of large, closed, steel forms that are expanded using a controlled explosion. This sculpture is not simply fabricated to look like it’s inflated—it has undergone a procedure that gives it volume. When I expand my work, I am attempting to dismantle my tie to an object by allowing it to become its own object.

Bio
Rodrigo Nava was born in 1978, in Mexico City. His work can be found in private and public collections throughout the U.S. and abroad. Nava maintains a residence in Putney, Vermont, where he is the head of the sculpture program at The Putney School. He frequents New York City to gain new inspiration, and continues his exploration of process-oriented art using steel and explosive-forming techniques. He is represented by Yellow Peril Gallery in Rhode Island.

www.rodrigonava.com


Victoria Palermo

Work Statement
My design for Camp Iris recalls tent structures and A-frame houses, ways of living in the northeast forests. Visitors can stroll through or lounge in Camp Iris for a color-filtered view of the landscape, as well as walk around the entire installation to experience the color-mixing effects of their movement. Iris was the Greek goddess of the rainbow, and I hope that Camp Iris adds color to each viewer’s day.

Bio
Victoria Palermo exhibits two- and three-dimensional work, large and small scale, in galleries and art venues across the country. Her work has garnered reviews in national media, including Sculpture magazine and the New York Times. The Fields at Art Omi, Chesterwood, and Salem Art Works have displayed Palermo’s outdoor work. Last summer, she created Camp Iris for the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, New York. Current public projects include the site-specific commission Up and Down at Albany International Airport and a bus shelter in North Adams, Massachusetts, sponsored by the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.

www.victoriapalermo.com


Karen Petersen

Work Statement
When I began concentrating on horses as sculpture, I wanted to get to the essence of the deep bond between equines and humans, and why people consider horses to be beautiful. I challenged myself to make a horse-like form that would be meaningful, yet stripped of extras like the expressive ears, or graceful mane and tail. The intention behind LADY was to create a femme, powerful, beautiful sculpture—lending the illusion that she is about to kick out her rear legs in jubilation, haunches raised, head down, ready to celebrate.

Bio
Karen Peterson was born in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and graduated from the University of Michigan in 1965. For the next 25 years, she followed her passion for sculpture and painting while also holding a position as a professor at Connecticut’s Hartford College for Women, University of Hartford, where she created and directed the college art gallery. The majority of her work is in cast bronze, but she has also worked with marble, cast aluminum, and fabricated aluminum. In 2000, she moved to Braintree, Vermont with her partner.

www.petersensculpture.com


Lionel Smit

Work Statement
MORPHOUS is an exploration of hybrid identity and its ever-changing nature in South Africa’s social landscape. It evokes a question of time, of past and future, and of the balance point at which my country finds itself, as it embarks on the next chapter of a post-apartheid and post-Mandela South Africa, a future South Africa. This “double-vision” is a foretelling and an acknowledgement of what has already passed, a societal commentary without judgment. The figures are charged with an emotive and gestural energy.

Bio
Lionel Smit is one of South Africa’s most noteworthy artists. He was born in 1982 in Pretoria, during the era of apartheid. His work manifests his ongoing fascination with and respect for the indigenous peoples of his country, notably the Cape Malayan peoples. Smit offers viewers an entry point into the variety and richness that lies beneath every face—a task he undertakes with great sensitivity. He started exhibiting right after art school at Pro Arte Alphen Park, and now lives and works in Cape Town. Best known for his contemporary portraiture executed through monumental canvasses and sculptures, Lionel is represented by CYNTHIA-REEVES in the U.S.

www.lionelsmit.co.za


Judith Wrend

Work Statement
Two curved shapes stand vertically, supporting a horizontal kinetic wand. Shapes and cutouts within the piece echo each other in the composition. Shadows and reflections change with the movement of light. Above it all, the two wands move in the wind in a constant dance. I created Voulez Vous to appeal to viewers’ emotions and invite them to engage with feelings, rather than thoughts, allowing them to relax, meditate, and go inward. My hope is that people will develop their own individual relationship with the sculpture, and join the dance.

Bio
Judith Wrend got hooked on making sculpture when she took a welding class at a community art center in Illinois—she was fascinated with moving forms and with the fabrication process. For over 40 years, she has been developing ideas and techniques for her kinetic and stabile sculptures. She works out of her home studio in Morrisville, Vermont.

judithwrend.com


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