2014 exposed

Exposed 2014

July 12 - October 15, 2014
Curated by Rachel Moore

23rd annual outdoor sculpture exhibition Exposed., hosting sculptures, site-specific installations and participatory work from national and international artists throughout the town of Stowe.

For 23 years, Exposed, Helen Day Art Center’s annual outdoor sculpture exhibition, has been a part of the community of Stowe, Vermont. Please join us once again as we celebrate sculpture, site-specific installation, and poetry by 19 local and internationally recognized artists and writers on display throughout the town.

2014 Jurors


Samantha Cataldo, Koch Curatorial Fellow, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum
DJ Hellerman, Curator, Burlington City Arts, Burlington, VT
Amy Rahn, Independent Curator & Arts Writer


Sculptors

Adria Arch & Lizzy Fox
Claire Ashley
Gregory Bailey
Ria Blaas
Cody James Brgant
Jodi Colella
Beka Goedde
Susie J. Gray
Monica Herrera
Karolina Kawiaka
John Matusz
Leeanna Morris
Evan Morse
Jonathan Prince
Oliver Schemm
Judith Wrend

Writers

David Budbill
Ariel Henley
Jennifer Rickards


Adria Arch & Lizzy Fox

I’ve always thought that the ubiquitous commercial lawn sign could be put to better use. I have collaborated with Lizzy Fox, whose poetry here refers to the natural world. Shedding and Prayer Attempted and may be read by viewers as they walk by the procession of signs. On the opposite side, a procession of colors winds through the landscape.”

Adria Arch & Lizzy Fox
“Meander” 2014. Plastic lawn signs & acrylic paint

Bio:
Adria Arch is a mixed media artist whose work features strong graphic elements and vivid color. She combines an abiding interest in shape with a fascination in the unexpected source, such as doodles or paint spills. Her recent site specific, collaborative murals may be viewed at Stonehill College, Lesley University, and Danforth Art Museum and School. Adria is also a technical consultant for Golden Artist Colors. She teaches privately and at local museums and art centers.

Recent exhibitions include the Art Complex Museum, the Bromfield Gallery, Exposed 2013, and the Cushing Martin Gallery at Stonehill College. Upcoming exhibitions include the Hunt Gallery at Mary Baldwin College, and the Grimshaw Gurdewicz Gallery at Bristol Community College.

For more information: www.adriaarch.com

Lizzy Fox:

Bio:
Vermont native Lizzy Fox, whose poems evoke our spiritual longing for home, was a featured writer and performer at Helen Day Art Center’s Exposed exhibit in 2013, where she met Adria Arch. This summer, she will begin attending the Vermont College of Fine Arts, working towards an MFA in writing. Her work is published in The Best of the Burlington Writers Workshop 2013 (for whom she also blogs), 2014’s Mountain Troubadour, and the second issue of The Southern Tablet. She also created a spoken word album, Coming To.

For more information: http://www.lizzyfoxpoetry.com/

Statement:
Plastic lawn signs are ubiquitous in the suburbs of America. We associate them with unsightly commercialism. They hawk everything from political campaigns to pest control companies. Using the format of the familiar lawn sign, this installation subverts its use as an unwelcome intervention and instead provides an interactive and contemplative experience.

Thirty lawn signs supported by wire frames feature flat colors based on the sequence of the color wheel. The other side features the poem “Shedding,” by poet Lizzy Fox. The poem has been broken down into many phrases in order to create a procession of words that viewers can read as they walk alongside the signs. In one direction, the viewer sees only the colors moving through the landscape. In the other direction, the viewer reads the poem while walking along.

The rhythmically-placed placards, situated approximately four feet apart, echo highway advertisements (such as the famous Burma Shave campaigns of the 1950s and 60s), as well as Christo’s Gates. They follow the natural twists and turns of a walking path, reflecting the contours of the landscape and functioning as visual contrast to the organic shapes of foliage and rocks. Meanwhile, Fox’s poetry provides the viewer with yet another way to interact with the installation and the countryside


Claire Ashley

Claire Ashley’s work investigates inflatables as painting, sculpture, installation and performance costume. Ashley is interested in the high-brow, aesthetic, visual pleasure found in painterly abstraction, the monumentality of sculptural objects, and the absurdly low-brow reference to bounce houses, cartoon characters and pop culture evoked by her forms.”

Bio:
Claire Ashley is from Edinburgh, Scotland. She currently teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Department of Contemporary Practices, and Department of Painting and Drawing. Her work has been shown nationally and internationally. Selected U.S. venues include: Columbus College of Art and Design, Columbus, OH; deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA; The Icebox at Crane Arts, Philadelphia, PA; The Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, IL; Plug Projects, Kansas City, MO. International venues include: Art Gallery of Mississauga, Ontario, Canada; gallerA1, Edinburgh, Scotland; and The Highland Institute for Contemporary Art, Inverness, Scotland.

For more information: http://www.claireashley.com/

Statement:
My work inhabits the liminal space between painting, sculpture, and performance costume. I mine the language of painterly abstraction, monumental sculpture, slapstick humor, and pop art to transform mundane industrial materials into inflatable painted sculptures and performative props.

I’m interested in the assumptions and history of both painting and sculpture. I create objects that engage in intellectual play, testing the boundaries and expectations of each medium, while exploring the possibilities of low-brow, mundane, unconventional materials.

I have explored many approaches to get at my desire for this conglomeration. In so doing, my work with inflatables has been the most satisfying. I find the inflatable form compelling, as it exists in two states: both as flaccid skin andtaught volume. I think of the polarities of form within these objects as metaphors for our bodies: inhaling/exhaling; taught/wrinkled skin; flaccid/erect organs, etc.

My work over the past 10 years evolved out of an examination of domestic objects of comfort and play. This impetus led me to explore forms—including my home, pillows, mattresses, and airbags—as symbols of comfort, and protection/over-protection. My recent work used silhouette shapes from architectural fragments of my home as a starting point from which an inflatable form is stitched. Once inflated, these architectural fragments become figurative: a reference to the people who dwell inside them and the thing that makes a house a home.


Greg Bailey

The cones in this sculpture represent the escalating effects of mismanagement of natural resources.”

Bio:
Greg Bailey creates art that functions for him as his most direct and honest response possible to the world around him. Bailey’s use of metaphor provides both a personal and universal context for his work, which combines narratives and contemporary theory. His sculptures engage in political, social, and cultural awareness and commentary, utilizing elements of wit, humor, irony, and visual aesthetic. A unifying theme in Bailey’s artwork is the interconnectedness of the environment and the self. A California native, he now lives in Connecticut, where he’s an associate professor of sculpture at Connecticut College.

Statement:
I was thinking about extra ordinary information regarding climate change when making the sculpture Prophecy. By definition, a prophecy is a message (usually some kind of mystical knowledge) that is communicated to a prophet, who in turn passes along the news to disciples. The cone shape in Prophecy represents the effect of an occurrence in space and time. The point of the cone symbolizes an event; everything inside the cone is what is influenced by that event. Climate scientists have received a prophecy, via data-collecting devices, including satellites orbiting in the heavens. Is it possible that we are ignoring a divine communication?


Ria Blaas

The heads were created by a process called charcoaling, which preserves wood and creates a skin-like texture.The Old Man and Full Moon Face are part of a collection of smaller heads that can be seen at The Path of Life sculpture garden in Windsor, Vermont.

Bio:
Ria Blaas is a sculptor, painter, and puppeteer. She was born in the Netherlands and attended the Academy of Fine Arts in Breda and Amsterdam, majoring in sculpture. In 1987, she immigrated to Vermont and has been an artist in residence through the Vermont Arts Council, exhibiting all over New England.

Statement:
Old Man River and Full Moon Face area byproduct of a commission that I worked on from 2008-2011. The commission was for twelve wooden heads, 8- to 12-feet tall carved out of pine logs. I then used a process called charcoaling, which I had used before for an installation of 18-foot tall figures carved from cherry logs. The process preserves wood (fence posts used to be charcoaled) and creates the skin-like texture that I was looking for.

The head called Old Man River is named after Faulkner’s novel about the Mississippi River flooding, because I feel that fire works on wood almost the same way as the constant current of water does. It brings out the grain, the essence. Old Man River and Full Moon Face are part of a collection of smaller heads that can be seen at The Path of Life sculpture garden in Windsor, VT.


Cody James Brgant

"A column of concrete lawn ornaments cast by the artist and placed within a devotional flower bed.”

Bio:
Cody James Brgant works in sculpture and photography. A native of Morrisville, VT, Brgant received a BA in Studio Art at The University of Vermont, where his work as a senior earned him The Jennifer Goldstein Memorial Prize. During his studies, Cody traveled extensively through New Zealand and spent a semester at the Glasgow School of Art in Scotland. His work has been shown in Burlington, Montreal, and New York. Cody currently lives and works in Brooklyn, where he is a cofounder and codirector of DEAD SPACE Gallery.

For more information: http://codyjamesbrgant.blogspot.com/

Statement:
Concrete garden ornaments are used to add that extra aesthetic touch to any garden. They range from deities to dogs, mythical creatures to fake rocks. Regardless of what they represent, they are displayed in the same environment—poking out of gardenia bushes, guarding vegetables, or hiding weeds. The garden context neutralizes their symbolism as they become a decoration. This sculpture injects a new significance into the garden ornaments by recontextualizing them in a totem-like structure or monument. This totem reminds the viewer of the past lives of these symbols, while the flowers in the garden create a devotion celebrating and mourning their lost meanings.


Jodi Colella

"Sculptures created from artifacts of domestic life and then treated to appear as if forged and bronzed. A trick of perception reinforcing the notion that nothing is as it seems – much like the representations of material culture.”

Bio:
Jodi Colella is a contemporary artist who creates tactile sculptures and installations laced with both whimsy and threat. Among a selection of recent exhibitions are: The Nobility of Things, solo exhibition, Fruitlands Museum, Harvard, MA; The Order of the Universe, Beard/Weil Galleries, Wheaton College, Norton, MA; Re:Constructed, solo exhibition, Carney Gallery, Regis College, Weston, MA; De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), Joshua Creek Heritage Art Center, Ontario, Canada; Outside/Inside the Box, FiberPhiladelphia, Philadelphia, PA; GREEN: the Color and the Cause, Textile Museum, Washington, DC. Her awards include 2013 Artist-in-Residence Fruitlands Museum, Pollack-Krasner Fellowship Vermont Studio Center, and 2012 Somerville Arts Council Fellowship. A graduate of Boston University, Jodi continued her studies at Massachusetts College of Art and Design and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston. She is currently having fun conceptualizing a series of interactive public art installations.

For more information: www.jodicolella.com

Statement:
Using the tree as a symbol of hearth, home and shelter, the sculptures consist of man-made objects composed into anthropomorphic bundles, each painted to simulate bronze statues. It is a trick of perception that nothing is as it seems, much like the representations of material culture.

Two of these assemblages were created during the summer of 2012. People donated items they compulsively collected for an installation in Union Square, Somerville, Massachusetts. From these gathered donations, I composed anthropomorphic bundles, and placed them high up in trees of full foliage. The installation was titled Stash. The sculptures were revealed when the season changed and the leaves dropped. The works are grab bags—full of miscellaneous treasures hidden from sight. Two of the bundles were bronzed to memorialize the concealed items.

The third assemblage, Reliquary, and twelve bronzed fiber balls are objects from the home and artifacts of domestic life – utensils, clothing, pillows, toiletries, toys, televisions. Installing in a tree is symbolic of nests and shelter. The tree becomes a holder of relics, much like a museum or other archive. The random items, cast in bronze, stand for a distinctive place and time.


Beka Goedde

"A fictitious force, in physics, is an apparent force; it is not due to one object or another accelerating, but instead the natural frame of reference itself is accelerating. The rug is a household object I employ especially for its concentric, circular, or centripetal and centrifugal pattern. Fictitious Force (2014) is a cast concrete tiled formation of a braided rug, planted in the ground.”

Bio:
Beka Goedde is a sculptor and printmaker whose work explores duration, the perception of change, and movement in physical space. Goedde has exhibited work at IPCNY, 80WSE, Recess, Cheim and Read (NYC); The Gowanus Studio Space, GRIDSPACE, and Saffron (Brooklyn); Habersham Mills (Atlanta); Incident Report (Hudson, NY); and Triple Canopy (online). This fall she will participate in a drawing exhibition at Inside Art Out Museum (Beijing). She is a graduate of the Bard MFA program in sculpture, and holds a BA from Columbia University (Barnard College) in Behavioral Neuroscience and Philosophy. Goedde was recently an artist-in-residence at JTHAR, Millay Colony, and PS122. This winter she will attend Yaddo. Goedde lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

For more information: www.bekagoedde.com

Statement:
A fictitious force, in physics, is an apparent force; it is not due to one object or another accelerating, but instead the natural frame of reference itself is accelerating (a car makes turns and the passenger in a car ‘moves’ side to side) or rotating (the earth rotates and ocean currents ‘move’ directionally).*

Fictitious Force (2014) is a cast concrete tile formation of a braided rug, planted in the ground. The rug is a household object I employ especially for its concentric, circular, centrifugal pattern. I began working with the rug as an object in an interior—in drawings, I located the rug on floorboards, or among other objects in a room. I’ve made several rugs that hang on the wall as large, flat, collaged paper objects. In sectioning the rug into discrete trapezoidal shapes, the rug becomes a drawing with concrete, planted in the earth.

Fictitious Force is intended to be trod upon like paving stones.The elliptical formation of the cast, tiled rug encircles the foreground view of the vast, pastoral landscape and mountain wilderness beyond.

*source: David Politzer, “What is a ‘fictitious force’?” in Scientific American; July 9, 2007.


Susie J. Gray

"Hurdles and sheep, inspired by traditional woodland crafts, woven by hand from Willow.”

Bio:
Susie J. Gray could never decide what she wanted to be when she grew up. Consequently, she wears multiple hats. She likes hats! When she is being the boss of herself, she spends her time designing edible landscapes and weaving willow, doing graphic design and illustration, painting, engaging in various fiber crafts, and writing. She is devoted to everything old-fashioned. Likes to laugh. And gave up on becoming a grown-up many years ago. Gray has recently embraced a mildly peripatetic lifestyle, awaiting a time when she can once again put down roots, somewhere in the green mountains of Vermont.

For more information: www.growinghealthbydesign.blogspot.com

Statement:
My most recent sojourn in England has bolstered my interest in making traditional woodland crafts, and my passion for willow, the plant, as a creative medium. Willow’s sweet fragrance, natural flexibility, strength, and penchant for life serve as a welcome reminder that I aspire to embody those same qualities myself.

This piece draws inspiration from “hurdles,” a traditional woodland craft. In essence a portable fence, hurdles were originally intended to contain and protect sheep, hence the term “sheepfold.” They were built to a particular size and shape, making them easy to carry and set up by the shepherd, and were traditionally geometric in shape, line, and pattern.

With that as a starting point, I’ve explored other configurations, alternately applying the traditional techniques I’ve learned and letting myself play. At times I’ve coaxed the willow to conform to my vision; at others, I’ve let the natural curve and line of the willow dictate the design. The resulting sheepfold expresses my reverence for the timeworn traditions of yesteryear and the importance of giving them place in the present day.


Monica Herrera

"Cascabels is a site-specific sound-sculpture with bells that are meant to be heard but also to be seen, touched, and rattled by the public. My purpose is to make a contemporary call upon the significance of the sound of bells in evoking a sense of community”

Bio:
Monica Herrera received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute in Chicago (2008), with a concentration in public art and sound installations. She works with multiple media—mostly sculpture, drawing, and installations—and is interested in the relationship between notions of culture/identity, urban spaces, and everyday life and objects. Herrera’s work has been shown in Mexico City and Puebla, Mexico; Chicago; Hammond, Australia; Madrid; Paris; Thessaloniki, Greece; Stowe; and Melbourne. She currently lives between Mexico City and Chicago, dedicated to her studio work.

For more information: www.monicaherreram.com

Statement
A couple years ago I presented a site-specific sound sculpture for Exposed, called Bells. My purpose was to make a contemporary call upon the significance of the soundof bells in evoking a sense of community.

Since then, I have continued my research into bells, and came across one particular type that is still used today, but whose design has not changed since its very origins. In the words of painter Eric Sloane, it is quite improbable to find “any other object that was created thousands of years ago in a form so perfect that no one since has been able to find a way of improving it.” This bell is known as “crotal” or “cascabel”. In its ancient, round, and glorious form, it’s ubiquitously found on children’s rattles, on Christmas decorations, on tambourines and other instruments, or tied around the ankles of Nahua ritual dancers.

This new proposal builds upon the one I presented two years ago. It uses cascabels to showcase not only their beautiful sound but, moreover, their brilliant design. It is a new site-specific sound sculpture with bells that are not only meant to be heard, but also to be seen, touched, and rattled by the public. I want to complement the sense of community that the sound of bells evokes with a sense of continuity through time. After all, even after thousands of years, the cascabel has maintained its original design.


Karolina Kawiaka

"We have an effect on the landscape and our values are clearly reflected in the environment. Architecture can be a lens through which we see the environment that can magnify our intentions and impacts. It is built deliberately as a folly and a lens with a poetic message about our relationship with the natural environment.”

Bio:
Karolina Kawiaka was trained as an artist and architect. She designs buildings and everyday objects, and also makes installations and drawings investigating the relationship of natural and manmade environments, often relating to infrastructure for energy and water. She is also a registered architect focusing on positive energy sustainable projects, and teaches studio art and sustainable design at Dartmouth College.

For more information: www.kawiaka.com

Statement:
We have an effect on the landscape and our values are clearly reflected in the environment. Our built structures embody our cultural values: they can be a lens through which we see the environment that can magnify our intentions and impacts.

Fractured Reflections is built deliberately as a folly and an ornament, with eccentric construction. It is a hall of mirrors with a subtle beauty that can be enjoyed by visitors of all ages, but also has a strong and poetic message about our relationship with the natural environment.


John Matusz

"It’s a continuation of a series of heads I’ve made over the years starting with wood carved heads around 1985, cement ones in 1989,then welded steel in 97 and then a stainless steel one in 2004. In 2005 I had the opportunity to work with Chris Curtis at his stone studio in Barre Vermont. There I learned some things about large-scale stone working techniques and “the head” is the result of that experience.”

Bio:
Born in the late ‘40s in upstate New York’s Mohawk River Valley, Matusz is the son of a carpenter and working mother. A childhood knack for drawing combined with high school visits to Munson Williams Proctor Institute in Utica, New York, shaped Matusz’s early artistic development.

From drawing, Matusz progressed to painting and the study of space and structure on canvas. He then began experimenting with sculpture, and received formal welding training in 1969 in Schenectady, New York. Welding accelerated Matusz’s sculptural development and is now the main focus of his attention. Currently, he lives and works in northern Vermont.

Description (Hive):
The term “hive” can be defined as a man-made receptacle for the housing of bees. It can also be described as a structure for the natural housing of bees. Hive is an 8’10” tall, 1200 pound all welded steel sculpture. It is a continuation of the line of work that I refer to as “membranes,” whereby I arrange and then weld different pieces of steel in vertical or horizontal planes that may reference familiar objects. In this piece, the membrane holds together cells or compartments that hint at a structure intended to house or store something—hence, the title Hive. Ultimately though, the title is merely a suggestion, and the viewer may interpret it differently.

Description (Commemorative Profile):
Commemorative Profile is cut from a slab of pink granite and mounted on a base of welded Corten steel. This is a continuation of a series that I’ve made over the years. The first head sculptures were made in 1985 of carved wood. In 1989 they made of cement, in 1997 they were made of welded steel, and in 2004 I made a stainless steel head. In 2005 I had the opportunity to work with Chris Curtis at his stone studio in Barre, Vermont. There I learned large-scale stone working techniques and the head, or “Commemorative Profile,” is the result of that experience.


Leeanna Morris

"This work is a playful abstraction of the sublime qualities of fellowship in nature and process.”

Bio:
Leeanna Morris grew up in the Texas Hill Country. She attended Southern Methodist University in Dallas for her undergraduate studies, receiving a BFA in art. While at SMU, she focused her studies on photography and honed a passion for the landscape. A recent graduate of Maine College of Art, where she earned her MFA, Morris’ work has evolved into a multimedia installation practice. She explores process, nature, and the sublime in playful ways.

For more information: www.la-morris.com

Statement:
Many hands have come together to complete this installation. Either I or a friend (who generously lent their time to my studio) individually formed each ceramic node. Every node is unique and carries the presence of the person who crafted it. Though separately they have character, as a mass they form a fellowship that echoes the participation that created them.

The shapes of the pieces are derived from moss and plant forms I encountered in a heath in northern Maine. The heath itself was a living collection of simple patterns repeated to create a vast, mysterious landscape. Just as many individual plants grew together to forge the heath, many pieces gather here to generate the artwork. This piece serves as a simple abstraction of the magnificent qualities of the natural world, as well as a record or impression of the camaraderie that emerged during their development.


Evan Morse

"A rhyton is a drinking vessel in the shape of a horn or animal head, typical in ancient times. This installation offers a ceremonial setting for rain to water the earth and, in turn, feed the trees that support the vessel.”

Bio:
Raised in the Boston area, Evan Morse has been pursuing a career in sculpture since graduating from Wheaton College (MA) in 2009. He works primarily in marble and has studied abroad in Carrara, Italy, as well as more locally at the Carving Studio and Sculpture Center in West Rutland, Vermont. His works range from representational figures to abstract, geometry-based compositions. He is currently an MFA candidate at Boston University.

For more information: http://morsesculpture.com/

Statement:
In much of my work, I am interested in exploring the beauty of simple geometries and physics. Rhyton follows this exploration and creates tension among a group of three trees by suspending a stone between them. The funnel shape of the stone vessel is intended to further draw visual tension between the stone and the ground below. The installation invites the viewer to consider a sense of drama and narrative between trees, stone, sky, and earth.


Jonathan Prince

"I am fascinated by perfected geometric forms that have had their surfaces interrupted by a tear or rupture – appearing simultaneously beautiful and broken.”

Bio:
Prince’s formal vocabulary draws upon his extensive knowledge of nature, science, and the human body. He is fascinated by artifacts and their power to mediate between history and contemporary society. Prince completed a doctorate at Columbia University and post-doctoral studies at the University of Southern California. He has produced feature films and directed numerous computer animated special effects projects, including an Emmy Award series for CBS television. He has been involved in several large-scale technology and art installations at such renowned venues as the Smithsonian Institution, and holds several design patents for his developments in optical engineering. According to critic Alexandra Anderson-Spivy, Prince’s return to the studio has produced “a mature body of work, refined in concept and fearless in execution.”

For more information: http://www.jonathanprince.com/

Statement:
For as long as I can remember, the idea of making something and the pride I felt from showing it to others has always been a force in my life.

When I was very young, my father took me to visit the studio of his friend Jacques Lipchitz in Hastings-on-Hudson. I remember being totally captivated watching and listening as he worked on a massive clay sculpture destined to become one of his famous bronzes. This was the ultimate “show and tell” game—and its influence on me has never diminished.

My work explores the tension between the perfect and the organic, the whole and the broken. For me, the ideal representation of physical perfection is Euclidean Geometry, the translation of mathematical axioms into pure form. The attenuation of those forms (by breaking, tearing, scarring, pixelating, etc.) all expose our humanity—the idea that try as we might, we are anything but perfect. Yet I like to believe that the breaks, tears, and scars can all possess an inherent beauty of their own.

At first glance my art may resemble archetypal forms, but a closer investigation may lead to more questions than answers about its provenance. My hope is that each individual observer will ask questions based on their own experience and thereby begin to discover more about art, life, nature, and themselves.


Oliver Schemm

"This interactive sculpture engages the viewer by allowing them to participate in the movement of Pendulum Face. Reminiscent of a steel catapult, this functionless metronome marks the human condition immersed in both linear and cyclical time……and it’s fun to make it move!”


Bio:
Oliver Schemm has been focusing on manipulated assemblage sculpture using a full range of materials and methods. His interactive sculptures have been exhibited at Exposed in 2011 (The Fish Wheel) and 2012 (GodBox I & II). Schemm is a full-time professor at Castleton College in Vermont, teaching studio art and art history. Pendulum Face is his latest endeavor into playful interactive sculpture.

For more information: oliverschemm.webnode.com

Statement:
I was born into a multicultural family. My mother grew up in Amsterdam, and my father is from Montana. As the son of a military physician, I have lived all over the world. To form a whole identity meant I had to combine incongruous elements in my life. Creating sculpture is my distilled perception of the world in form. I see existence as a myriad of unending interactions and layers, and it intrigues me to combine these elemental relationships in my work. The narrative of history, memory, and time are conveyed by my use of materials and composition. By uniting perceived function with absurdity I mimic human experience. Mixing time periods and cultural traditions helps me to organize and formally understand the flow and turbulence of the world.

My language for understanding existence is expressed in the binary nature of unions. The symmetrical nature of my work relates to the balance and mirroring of forms and ideas in the physical world. The interstitial space between these unions becomes the connective tissue linking disparate thoughts and objects, binding them with intense energy that creates a new whole.

I’m inspired by history, science, Deep Play, cold and warm materials, movement, and tension. Above all, a need to instill curiosity fuels my work. I use multiple methods—including assemblage, casting, and subtractive carving—to make sculptures that all at once are functionless machines, shrines, and personal and societal mile markers.


Judith Wrend

"The asymmetry of the form is emphasized by the diagonal line through it and the similar line that props up one bottom edge. Seen as a figure, it appears ready to step off into the unknown.”

Bio:
Judith Wrend grew up in Kalamazoo, and currently lives and works in Morrisville, VT. She received degrees in Spanish from Kalamazoo College and the University of Chicago. In the early 1970s, she took a welding class, and knew she had found her life’s work. Her work is included in the Bronfman Collection, Seagrams Building, and IVACO in Montreal; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston; Vermont Art in State Buildings in Middlesex; GE Energy Systems in Atlanta; and Copley Hospital in Morrisville; and many private collections.

Statement:
An irregular, cropped pyramid stands, leaning slightly. The asymmetry of the form is emphasized by the diagonal line through it and the similar line that props up one bottom edge.

Seen as a figure, it appears ready to step off into the unknown.


David Budbill

Bio:
David Budbill lives in the southwest corner of Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom. Exterminating Angel Press published his latest book of poems, Park Songs: a Poem/Play, in September 2012. At the end of last year, Budbill sent to Copper Canyon Press a new book of poems called Tumbling Toward the End. His most recent play, A Song for My Father, received its third production at The Western Stage in Salinas, CA, in November of 2013. Garrison Keillor reads frequently from Budbill’s poems on NPR’s The Writer’s Almanac.


Ariel Henley

Bio:
Ariel Henley is a California native living and writing in Burlington, Vermont. She graduated from the University of Vermont in 2013 with her B.A. in English and Political Science. She is currently enrolled in Champlain College’s Emergent Media M.F.A. program. She has a deep appreciation for memoirs, narrative essays, and any writing that’s emotional, raw, and real. Her current passion lies in exploring unique and interesting ways to share her story, while mixing writing with other mediums.



Jennifer Rickards

Bio:
Jennifer Rickards writes poetry and creative nonfiction, and recently participated in storytelling at The Mudroom, the AVA Gallery & Art Center’s version of The Moth, a popular amateur and professional storytelling event. Before moving to Northern New England, she was an active member of PoetsWest, with regular poetry readings in and around Seattle. Jennifer lives with her husband and two daughters in Etna, NH. She is associate director of the Montshire Museum of Science.


 

 

 

Exhibition Sponsors

footer spacer

Grantors

                              

Education Sponsors

     Media Partners