2016 exposed article

 

Exposed. 2016

Exhibition dates: July 23 – October 15, 2016
Opening Saturday, July 23rd at 4:00 pm for a reception
and walkabout with progressive hors d'oeuvres.

Curated by: Rachel Moore
Helen Day Art Center is pleased to present the 25th Anniversary of Exposed. This year will include 16 local and national sculptors and poetry on storefront windows.


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Exposed Opening & Walkabout

Saturday, July 23rd @ 4PM
Meet us in the galleries for sangria, then join us to walk around town, listen to artists speak about their work, and enjoy tastings from local restaurants. Afterward, meet us for pizza and beer on the front lawn of the Art Center for a farewell party for our Executive Director, Nathan Suter. Thank you for 10 years of passion, dedication, and progressive vision, Nathan!


2016 Jurors:

Theresa Choi
Assistant Curator, Storm King Art Center
Theresa Choi is Assistant Curator at Storm King Art Center where she has also served as Curatorial Assistant and Curatorial Intern. She was an editor and contributor to Mark di Suvero (2015), co-published by Storm King and DelMonico Books/Prestel. She also serves as an assistant in the Brooklyn studio of sculptor Virginia Overton. She is a graduate of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College.

Katherine Hart
Senior Curator of Collections and
Barbara C. & Harvey P. Hood Curator of Academic Programming, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College
Katherine Hart is a museum curator, educator, and art historian who has worked at the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, for the last twenty-five years. She also has served in curatorial and research positions at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, UCLA's Wight Art Gallery, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She works primarily in the areas of the English art after 1700 and contemporary art and photography. She has curated or coordinated numerous exhibitions on such subjects as environmental photography, ancient Greek childhood, William Hogarth, Romare Bearden, English caricature, images of war, visual culture of medicine, and Inuit art and culture.

Ian Alden Russell
Curator, David Winton Bell Gallery, Brown University
Ian Alden Russell is an international curator based in Providence, Rhode Island. Currently the Curator of Brown University’s David Winton Bell Gallery, his curatorial work has been hosted by Artpace (San Antonio), Chinese University of Hong Kong, Fire Station Artists’ Studios (Dublin), Koç University (Istanbul), Ormston House (Limerick, Ireland), Irish Museum of Modern Art, Jockey Club Creative Arts Centre (Hong Kong), the Museum of Innocence (Istanbul), and the National College of Art & Design (Dublin). His writings have been published by Cambridge University Press, Cittadellarte, deCordova Museum & Sculpture Park, Lars Muller Publishers, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Oxford University Press, Springer-Kluwer, and Yapı Kredi Publishers. Born in Richmond, Virginia and educated in Ireland, he holds a Ph.D in History from Trinity College Dublin. More information on his work can be found at: http://ianaldenrussell.com


Participating artists

Scott Boyd
Theodore Ceraldi
Christopher Curtis
Ana Gallira
Rob Hitzig
Marjorie Kaye
Stephen Klema
Amy Königbauer and Knayte Lander
Colin Moore
Torin Porter
Kate Skakel
David Tanych
Jonathan Waters
Jaehyo Lee
Mark Chatterley


 Participating writers

Ryan Walsh grew up in West Virginia. He is author of the chapbooks Reckoner(Chickadee Chaps & Broads, 2015) and The Sinks (Midwest Writing Center Press, winner of the 2010 Mississippi Valley Poetry Chapbook Contest). Poems have appeared in Blackbird, Ecotone; FIELD; Forklift, Ohio; Green Mountains Review; Narrative, and elsewhere. His honors include scholarships and grants from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and the Vermont Arts Council. He works as the Development & Writing Program Director at the Vermont Studio Center and lives in Burlington, VT.

Work Statement

Thinking of the word “Exposed,” my mind turns to all its meanings: not only to be revealed or made visible but also to be influenced by or subject to (as in subjected to needless risk). It makes me think of how much we look at and depend on screens in our current era of so-called connectivity. The lines in these windows all come from “The Pines,” one of three poems in my chapbook, Reckoner, which was published by Chickadee Chaps & Broads and letterpress-printed by May Day Studio in Montpelier. I mention the handset type because it’s a poem that harkens (back? forward?) to a world made by hand. In “The Pines” and other poems, I am trying to explore certain questions. What are we without our devices? What is our relationship to the earth? In the dark or in the woods, stripped of the Cloud, what is exposed?

ryankwalsh.tumblr.com

 


Scott Boyd

Work Statement

The sculpture, Sirens, is a study in levity and gravity. It is constructed of 1/4-inch bronze rod with an English Brown patina applied. The shading is done with vinyl screening and the piece is sealed with polyurethane. Each of the box-like shapes is in a subtly different stage of development and positioning in relation to the overall structure. The screen overlays create moire patterns while adding depth and shadow. The screening is adjusted slightly from shape to shape to emphasize a transition. While suggesting biomorphic forms, Sirens is a constructive hybrid of lines and shapes occurring in two and three dimensions.

The second sculpture, Parker, is similarly constructed. This piece was inspired by the jazz musician, Charlie Parker, and has an architectural quality that defines form and space as a sort of melodic evolution. Expansion and contraction, folded symmetries, shadings and overlays, syncopation, and an open invitation to improvise unfold as one’s perspective shifts while looking at the sculpture.

Bio
Scott Boyd’s sculptures are sourced from ideas that draw on his various interests, distractions, intuitions, and curiosity. Over the years, Boyd has experimented with many different manners of expression. While incorporating the idea of perspective and transition into his sculpture, he creates engaging works that open up on a number of different levels. Boyd has a BA from Reed College and an MFA from Yale University. He lives and works in Stowe, Vermont. His other pursuits include poetry, photography, drumming and dancing Argentine tango.

scottboydsculpture.com



Theodore Ceraldi

Work Statement
​Carbon represents the destruction of the planet’s forests. From the Cedars of Lebanon State Park to the jungles of Brazil, people have cut, burned, and destroyed an irreplaceable habitat for fauna and oxygen-producing flora. In the process, they have also destroyed much of the planet’s carbon sink. This piece calls attention to the destruction by elevating a 144-year-old white cedar log, cut in the Northeast Kingdom, to a sacrificial state supported and penetrated by 12 red steel lances, indicative of omnipotent human intervention.

Bio
Theodore Ceraldi is a graduate of Cooper Union in New York City. His work has been acquired by many private collectors and shown in several one-man shows. His sculpture and ironwork is installed in the United States, England, and Saudi Arabia. His sculpture, Big Red Swing, is cited in New York‘s 50 Best Art in Public Places, and a model of his House for an Artist, along with accompanying conceptual drawings, were exhibited at MOMA in New York City. He has taught landscape drawing, figure painting, and two and three-dimensional design. His work embraces process, the poetry of form, and formal relationships.

www.ceraldi.net


Mark Chatterley

Work Statement

The Watchers
We are all under surveillance, real or imagined. From video, computer, phone, nosey neighbors, forces unseen. Every action is being monitored.
The piece is consisting of seven elements representing the seven directions. North, South, East, West, Up, Down, and Self. Six of the elements represents the power of 3.

Exposed Memories
I am interested in memories and how we perceive memories. For me memory is like a bubble, it’s a snippet of time that has no connection. I envision it as spheres or bubbles of thought. It goes along with my interest in Quantum Physics and multidimensional universes. Bubbles that touch each other but are separate.

Priestess
I enjoy the spiritual of art, and the human form allows me to explore that aspect of life. Priestess is a powerful woman - standing strong, able to take on all problems. There are echoes of the past along with hints of the future. The eyes are open for souls to go in, giving her body a dwelling place for the spirit.

Bio
Michigan sculptor Mark Chatterley is known for his large ceramic figures with unique glazes. He started throwing pots over thirty years ago. Feeling limited by the shapes he could form on the wheel, it wasn't until he returned to school in pursuit of his Master’s degree that he began sculpting clay by hand. He now deals with large-scale sculptural ceramic pieces that he makes by himself, focusing primarily on the figure, with a metaphysical theme. Each piece is unique with the surface ranging from a shiny metallic to a crusty texture reminiscent of rusted metal or weathered stone.

markchatterley.wix.com/sculpture

 



Christopher Curtis

Work Statement
The idea of juxtaposition has always been interesting to me. In the sculpture Demeter, sleek stainless steel contrasts with a natural boulder. The stone, with its own combination of rough and smooth textures, reveals the difference of outer dullness and inner color. The impossible piercing and defiance of gravity add more layers of counterpoint. Beauty and peril—an intriguing combination.

In Greek mythology, Demeter, the beautiful mother of Persephone, braved great danger when she ventured to the underworld to confront Hades, who had stolen her daughter. He agreed to allow Persephone freedom for six months of the year. When Demeter ascended from the underworld carrying her daughter, their shared joy manifested in the creation of springtime. Still, in half a year, Persephone must return to Hades and winter will descend again.

Bio
Christopher Curtis is a stone and metal sculptor working in Stowe. A Vermont native, he was born in 1951 and attended UVM, where he studied sculpture and fine art. There, his mentor Paul Achenbach insisted he develop a broad range of sculpting skills, which led him to delve into a variety of media, including stone, stainless steel, bronze, wood, glass, and fine metals. Curtis has now been a sculptor for over forty years. His current works reflect his passion for stone, and persistent interest in incorporating science and technology into his creations.

www.christophercurtis.com


Ana Gallira

Work Statement
Pinwheel is designed to create a whimsical perspective on alternative energy. The piece works as a wind generator, creating electricity to power lights, and is equipped with a repurposed treadmill motor and battery. The reference to an iconic toy attracts the curiosity of children, while simultaneously questioning our carefree nature, which has led to a lifestyle that undercuts the foundation of a sustainable environment. Through this sculpture, I want to draw attention to collaborative solutions that can contribute to a healthier environment, and galvanize us toward social change beginning at a young age.

Bio
Ana Gallira is an artist and activist based in New York’s Hudson Valley. She received a dual degree in fine art and mathematics from the University at Albany, and is currently a graduate student at the State University of New York at New Paltz. She is also teaching an introduction to sculpture class, tying in her interest in social awareness and the environment.

anagallira.com



Rob Hitzig

Work Statement
Pick 'Em Up is intended to evoke the joy and playfulness that is, ideally, a part of our childhood. It’s created with the memory of the game pick up sticks, and it’s bright, big, and bold—because sometimes, it’s fun to be indiscreet.

Bio
Rob Hitzig is blessed to have the freedom to work in a studio every day, in spite of ending his formal art education in eighth grade. Armed with a liberal arts background and a graduate degree in Environmental Sciences, he began his professional career as a forester in West Africa with the Peace Corps. He then worked for the Environmental Protection Agency for 10 years, addressing groundwater contamination issues. In 2004, he made a dramatic lifestyle change in order to follow his artistic inspiration. After 12 years, he remains regret-free and thankful for not knowing what the future will be.

roberthitzig.com



Marjorie Kaye

Work Statement

Energy Transmission is composed of layers of discs cut to create lyrical and organic forms. This piece seeks movement by the juxtaposition of gradating color originating in and emerging from its purest form in the bottom pieces. As I move up the column of components, each section answers a little bit to the addition of vermillion, until the top is saturated completely in red. By this sequential addition of color to color, I have created movement from the bottom of the piece to the pinnacle in rhythmic undulations.

In Energy Transmission, I work within a singular point that seems stretched or elongated, as in the formation of a timeline. It’s a balance between dichotomies, expressive gesture residing within classical form. Although boldly saturated, its construction and color stand out within the natural setting, while also being informed by it.

Bio

Marjorie Kaye is a Cambridge, MA-based wood sculptor whose work has been an exploration of opposites: form and color; organic and geometric; precision and chaos. Bright and bold, her pieces are kinetic and energetic. She has been reviewed in many publications, like the Boston Globe and ArtScope Magazine, and has shown extensively—including at Galatea Fine Art in Boston, Atlantic Works Gallery in East Boston, Harbor Gallery at UMass Boston, and Space Womb Gallery in New York City.

www.marjoriekayeart.com


Stephen Klema

Work Statement

Hobbes' Claw 3 is one of a series of sculptures using the shape of a circular saw blade as a starting point and source of investigation. Each piece creates an interpretation from the repetition of essential geometric shapes, mimicking the repetitive motions of saw blade rotation and mechanical movement. The series investigates the confluence of mechanical processes, organic forms, and natural materials, and reflects the dichotomy of destruction and creation.

Hobbes' Claw 3 is constructed of interlocking geometric wood shapes, stained with wood tones and overlaid on a metal field. The "gears" are metal, plastic and painted wood. The cowling is composed of painted plywood and metal layers.

Bio

Stephen Klema is a sculptor, designer, and design educator who has shown his work in regional and national juried exhibitions. He works with vector software, wood, and a variety of saws. He received his MFA from the Hartford Art School, and his BFA from the Atlanta College of Art.

stephenklema.com



Amy Königbauer

Work Statement:
Engagement Ceremony offers a moment of connection through participation. The sculpture offers a place for two people to engage with one another. While seated and looking down, they will discover instructions embedded within the piece, asking them to hold hands and further deepen their relationship. The bond and energy created through this interaction creates Engagement Ceremony. When the participants recall what happened during their exchange some time in the future, extending the performance beyond the present moment, the work is complete.


Bio
Amy Königbauer, born in 1981, and Knayte Lander, born in 1985, are collaborative conceptual and visual artists. Since 2011, they have worked together to explore themes of romance, fear, grief, and connection. Their joint works use an interdisciplinary approach to advance unfamiliar expressions of these ideas, and they aim to create experience over product. The majority of their pieces are shown only once, and documented independently by participants. They currently live in Montpelier.

www.amyek.com


Jaehyo Lee

Work Statement
Until recently, my work has been about combining wood with nails or steel bars and integrating them into geometrical shapes such as spheres, hemispheres, or cylinders. Whenever I did this, one of my problems was to keep the nails and bolts out of sight. Now, on the contrary, I put an emphasis on the nails themselves. I drive countless nails into wood, bend them, grind them, and make them protrude. I then burn the wood, blackening its growth ring records and its natural color. The glittering metallic nails on black charcoal become ever more conspicuous, and through this process, I draw a picture on wood using nails.

"I hope to reveal the beauty in what is usually seen but not noticed. It may be a rusty bent nail. If you take a close look at it, however, you'll find out how beautiful it can be."
source

Bio
Since graduating in 1992 with a BFA from the Hong-Ik University, Jaehyo Lee has gained acclaim both in his native Korea and internationally for his distinct yet intimately crafted oeuvre. Combining distinct traces of land art, arte povera, and minimalism, Lee´s works cast a questioning eye over the roots of form, its function, and its role within the natural world.

Lee´s sculptures willfully play with the boundaries between modern art and design, referencing the idealist´s cubes, cylinders, and cones as perversions of the chaise lounge, coffee table, lampshade, and even the humble doughnut. Revealing a subtly humorous and unsentimental attitude to nature, these works are united by a belief that the beauty of art is a product of its labor, whether this be the meticulous carving of larch trunks into a perfect sphere, or the precise bending and sanding of thousands of nails hammered one after another into a hunk of lumber.

Amongst many other distinctions, Lee was the 1998 Grand Prize Winner at the Osaka Triennial and 2002 recipient of the prestigious Irish Sculpture in Woodland commission. His works are held in public and private collections across Europe, Asia, and North America.
(From Madison Gallery Website)

leeart.name


Colin Moore

Work Statement
Affect has a brusque appearance when you view it from the side, in profile. Head on, it reflects a more vulnerable mood. I wished to show the dichotomy between our inner feelings and body language, which we may use to disguise our emotions. We’ve seen this paradoxical behavior in our children, and may have similarly concealed our own true feelings during our adolescence, as we pushed our boundaries and struggled to assert independence.

Bio
Colin Moore explores emotions and relationships between people and the world they live in. His work represents the common human experience, with all its myths and frailties. He captures that sense of transience in the ephemeral quality of his sculptures, which viewers will notice when moving around or through them.

Aware that we perceive three-dimensional objects using a primitive part of the brain that creates a visceral memory, Moore uses objects and space to communicate feelings. His intention is to invite the viewer to be present and accept the moment, with the trust that—whether fabulous or futile—it is perfect just as it is.

www.colinmooresculpture.com


Torin Porter

Work Statement
These rare Ear Trumpet Plants in The Great Earscape were first discovered sprouting out of the ground at Phish’s Magnaball Festival 2015 in Watkins Glen, New York. They thrive on the whispers, gurgles, and songs of the life forms around them, beckoning those within range to utter their heart’s desires into the ears of these attentive fronds, whereupon the sound messages are instantly conveyed from one to all through a network of underground tubers. I enjoy the fact that this sculpture engages not only sound, but also sight and touch, and that the sound is provided by the participant. It provides a way for people use their voice to connect with and explore art as a social medium.

Bio
Torin Porter has exhibited in solo and group shows throughout New England and in New York city. His passion for sculpture has its roots in early experiences. Born in 1969 in northeastern Vermont, he grew up next door to the Bread & Puppet Theater and became a performer. There, he was influenced by the sculptural masks and puppets interacting with the landscape and audience. Torin received his B.A. in Studio Art from Dartmouth College, where he began exploring the possibilities of hands-on steel sculpture and outdoor installations.

www.torinporter.com


Kate Skakel

Work Statement

The prospect of capturing light fascinates me; although light carries no weight, it controls our days, and oftentimes our moods. In Mirror Table, I created a piece that gives light physical weight. One of the most intriguing aspects is that the sculpture disappears from certain angles, and can only be fully seen if the viewer stands slightly above it. The viewing experience changes drastically depending on the time of day, and how the sun hits it. So, while this work has a physical presence, it still carries the same ephemerality as light.

Bio
Kate Skakel grew up in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and New York, and currently lives in Burlington, Vermont, where she recently graduated from UVM. Skakel has been interested in design since she was a child, and after studying the works of minimalist artists—Richard Serra, in particular—she was inspired to create her own art. She has since become fascinated with the themes of weight, scale, and light, which can is reflected throughout her sculptures. Skakel works primarily with film photography, sculpture, and silkscreen printmaking.

kateskakel.com


David Tanych

Work Statement

These pieces were influenced by the 40+ years that I was in the building supply industry. I fabricated the nuts in 2010, my first year in Southern California.

The nails were produced in 2014, in my Culver City, California studio.


Bio
“Size matters,” according to fine woodworker and metal sculptor David Tanych. He has been building objects since his father gave him a saw, hammer, nails, and a block of wood at the age of 10. A veteran home and furniture builder, he has turned his interest in design and fabrication from the functional to the imaginative. His most recent pieces have been likened to the work of sculptor Claes Oldenburg—they represent common objects that have been altered from their original purpose to works of art, thanks to their massive scale. The results are fun and playful, and instantly bring the viewer back in time.

davidtanych.com

 


Jonathan Waters

Work Statement
Looking In Looking Out numbers 1 and 2 frame the landscape as people move by them.This involves the viewer directly in the experience of the piece .The interior negative space changes as one moves around the sculpture, addressing the perception of how we see. They shift in shape as one circulates around them, interacting with one another, superimposing and activating the space between them.

Bio
Jonathan Waters was introduced to sculpture as a child by his grandfather, sculptor Heinz Warneke. He went on to study with the artist Charles Ginnever in Vermont and David von Schlegell in Connecticut, earning his MFA at Yale. While living in New York CIty, he worked for Richard Serra and Mark DiSuvero and maintained his own practice. In 1985 he moved back to Connecticut and became an oyster farmer. He returned to sculpture and printmaking in 2007, actively exhibiting in the northeast. He is presently represented by the Fred Giampietro Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut.

jonathanwatersart.com


Made possible by the support of the following partners & sponsors

Presenter

Petra & Stephen Levin


Major Partners

ACABAY
Gail & Steven Blumsack
Town of Stowe


Partners

Steve & Mary Jean Beimdiek
Cushman Design Group
Diane Arnold & Dean Goodermote
Frank & Elaine Ittleman
Patterson & Smith Construction


Sponsors

Drs. Leslie Abramson & Fred Rossman
Dave Couch Signs
Violette
Xpress Print & Copy
Stowe Reporter
Stowetoday.com
National Endowment for the Arts
Vermont Arts Council
Green Mountain Inn

 


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